IADT treatment guidelines for lateral luxation

lateral-luxation4

Clinical findings

  • The tooth is displaced, usually in a palatal/lingual or labial direction.
  • It will be immobile and percussion usually gives a high, metallic (ankylotic) sound.
  • Fracture of the alveolar process present.
  • Sensibility tests will likely give negative results.

Radiographic findings

  • The widened periodontal ligament space is best seen on eccentric or occlusal exposures.

Treatment

  • Reposition the tooth digitally or with forceps to disengage it from its bony lock and gently reposition it into its original location.
  • Stabilize the tooth for 4 weeks using a flexible splint.
  • Monitor the pulpal condition.
  • If the pulp becomes necrotic, root canal treatment is indicated to prevent root resorption.

Follow-up

  • 2 weeks – Clinical and radiographic examination.
  • 4 weeks – Splint removal, clinical and radiographic examination.
  • 6-8 weeks – Clinical and radiographic examination.
  • 6 months – Clinical and radiographic examination.
  • 1 year – Clinical and radiographic examination.
  • Yearly for 5 years – Clinical and radiographic examination.